Scream And Scream Again



American International Pictures

Directed by Gordon Hessler

Produced by Max Rosenberg/Milton Subotsky/Louis M. Heyward

Written by Christopher Wicking

Based on the novel “The Disoriented Man” by Peter Saxon

As the opening credits of SCREAM AND SCREAM AGAIN play out, we’re watching a fit young man jogging through what presumably is a park in London. He sure seems like a healthy bloke which is why it’s a surprise when he suddenly grabs his heart and collapses. He wakes up lying in a hospital bed. A nurse comes into his room and tends to him but refuses to answer his questions. She leaves. The bloke tries to sit up in bed but something’s not quite right. He pulls back the covers to see that one of his legs has been amputated below the knee. Quite understandably he screams bloody murder.


We will revisit this unlucky chap during the course of the movie’s 95 minute running time and each time we do, he’ll be missing another limb. When Tom Deja and I discussed SCREAM AND SCREAM AGAIN on a “Better In The Dark” episode we both admitted how we felt guilty watching this movie and laughing at the guy’s plight because after awhile it’s like the blackest of black comedies. Every time the poor bastard goes to sleep, he wakes up missing a limb.


But we’ve got other things going in the movie. In fact, there are three totally separate stories going on that on the surface seem to be unrelated to each other. In one, Peter Cushing is a highly placed official working for the government of an unidentified European totalitarian county that is clearly supposed to be based on Nazi Germany. One of his junior officers has apparently mastered the Vulcan neck pinch so well that he can kill people with it. He’s moving up the ladder of power, killing the higher-ups as he does so.


In the second story Dr. Browning (Vincent Price) is a brilliant research physician specializing in limb and organ transplants who is questioned by the police. They’re looking for a serial rapist/killer who apparently has vampiric abilities. Two of Dr. Browning’s assistants have fallen victim to the fiend and needless to say even though the good doctor claims no knowledge at all of how this could be so, the police find him highly suspicious.


In the third story, Christopher Lee is the chief of an unnamed British intelligence service who finds himself dealing with the political/diplomatic fallout when one of his spy planes has either been shot down or accidentally crashed in a certain unidentified European totalitarian country.


And while we bounce back and forth between these three seemingly unrelated stories, we keep revisiting that poor bastard in the hospital bed who is trapped in the world’s worst game of Operation!

If you’ve never seen SCREAM AND SCREAM AGAIN (and I highly recommend you seek it out if you never have) when you see it for the first time you can be forgiven for thinking that this movie must have been put together by a film editor who A: Was high as a cooter on crack and booze when he worked on this. B: Was pissed at the studio or C: Just didn’t give a shit about his job. Because since Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing and Vincent Price never share a single scene together, the movie plays out for most of its running time as if the film editor took three different movies; one starring Mr. Lee, one starring Mr. Cushing and one starring Mr. Price then haphazardly edited scenes from each of those movies into one. And yeah, you read that right. The three stars of the movie never share a scene together. Mr. Lee and Mr. Price appear on screen together for maybe a minute at the film’s very end.

But here’s the twist: the three separate plots do eventually converge and when they do, you may find yourself nodding your head as I did the first time I saw it and saying; “Okay, that’s a bit of alright.” This is the kind of movie where you shouldn’t even bother trying to play the game of what’s going to happen next or attempt to figure out where the movie is going or how it’s going to end. Trust me; it’s impossible to do that with SCREAM AND SCREAM AGAIN. Just sit back and enjoy where it takes you. It’s science fiction, it’s black comedy, its horror, it’s a political/paranoia/conspiracy thriller and it’s Highly Recommended.

95 Minutes

Rated R

The Ten Commandments



Paramount Pictures

Directed by Cecil B. DeMille

Produced by Cecil B. DeMille and Henry Wilcoxon

Screenplay by Aeneas MacKenzie, Jesse L. Lasky, Jr., Jack Gariss and Fredric M. Frank

Based on “Prince of Egypt” by Dorothy Clarke Wilson “Pillar of Fire: by J.H. Ingraham

“On Eagle’s Wings” by A.E. Southon and The Holy Scriptures

One of the stories my parents like to tell about me is the one where they took me as a baby to a showing of THE TEN COMMANDMENTS. They say that there were a number of other babies who had to be taken out of the theater because of their crying but according to them, I uttered not so much as a burp throughout the entire three hours and thirty-nine minutes. In fact, my mother claims I simply and quietly stared at the screen with wide open eyes as if hypnotized. Maybe I was. Now, I dunno if this explains my lifelong movie addiction but I do know that if you ask me what my favorite movie is, my answer is THE TEN COMMANDMENTS. If there was only one movie that I could watch for the rest of my life, it would be that one.

I grew up watching THE TEN COMMANDMENTS on ABC here in New York as they would faithfully air the movie each and every Easter. They used to show it in two parts (On Sunday and Monday) and then switched to a single night showing (with commercials it ran from 7PM to 11:30PM) and for some inexplicable reason in recent years ABC has been airing it on the Saturday night before Easter. But it doesn’t matter to me. The first movie I bought on Blu-Ray was THE TEN COMMANDMENTS and I still watch it every Easter, starting it at 7PM on the dot. In fact, it’s playing in the background as I write up this review.

Why do I love THE TEN COMMANDMENTS so much? First of all, it’s quite simply a magnificent story. Moses (Charlton Heston) is born a Hebrew slave, spared from death by his mother Yochabel (Martha Scott) setting him adrift on the waters of The Nile River. The infant is raised by Bithiah (Nina Foch) the sister of The Pharaoh Sethi (Sir Cedric Hardwicke) She keeps his Hebrew heritage a secret, which is shared by her servant Memnet (Judith Anderson)

Moses is raised as a prince of Egypt and is looked upon as a son by the old Pharaoh. This earns Moses the jealousy of Prince Rameses II (Yul Brynner) who already sees himself as the next Pharaoh. It also doesn’t help that they both are in love with Nefretiri (Anne Baxter) the throne princess who must by law marry the man who will be Pharaoh.


Eventually, Moses learns of his true heritage and the secret is also discovered by Rameses who has Moses banished. The life Moses once knew as a prince is over but he has a new destiny before him, one that is imparted to him by God Himself in the form of a burning bush. Moses is to return to Egypt and liberate the Hebrew people from their slavery.

That’s the barest outline of the story but it doesn’t begin to explore the complexities of the relationships between the characters and how their lives play out in such an epic, impressive movie. And make no mistake about it…THE TEN COMMANDMENTS is BIG. And that brings me to my second reason why I love the movie so much. They just simply just don’t make movies like this anymore. Everything from the costuming to the sets is larger than life. If Cecil B. DeMille needed a city in his movie then by God he went out and built a city. If he needed a crowd scene with hundreds of thousands of people he went out and hired and costumed hundreds of thousands of people and put them on the screen. In this day and age where all the special effects are done by CGI and filmed on virtual sets it gives a movie like this weight and life when you look at it and realize that these are actual people and actual sets. This is a movie that truly deserves to be called spectacular just on a technically physical level.


The acting has been criticized as being “over the top” and “melodramatic” and my response is that of course it is. When you have a story and setting this enormous you’ve got to have actors and acting to match. If Charlton Heston had never made another movie after this his place in movie history would still be assured. Moses was the role he was born to play, plain and simple. He starred in another Biblical epic three years later “Ben-Hur” but this is the movie that everybody thinks of first when Charlton Heston’s movie career is talked about.


Anne Baxter gleefully chews every piece of scenery in sight and has more fun with her dialog than anybody else in the cast. Her scenes with Sir Cedric Hardwicke have real humor and affection while her scenes with Yul Brynner are nothing less than white hot. In fact, I believe I enjoy her scenes with him more than her scenes with Charlton Heston, to be honest.  Yul Brynner comes close to stealing the movie more than a few times. One of the excellent aspects of the screenplay is that it takes time to examine and explore everybody’s point of view and motivations and the motivations of Rameses are clear and understandable, if misguided.

Yvonne DeCarlo is an actress whose popularity I’ve never been able to understand as she always acts as if she’s bored to death in every movie I’ve seen her in. Even here she comes off as if she’s barely interested in what she’s doing. Much better are dependable old friends such as Vincent Price and John Carradine who throw themselves gleefully into their roles. And then we’ve got Edward G. Robinson who effortlessly steps into the protagonist role in the second half of the movie and does so brilliantly (“Where’s yer Gawd now, Moses?”)

Blu-Ray has spoiled me watching THE TEN COMMANDMENTS as the detail, color and audio is absolutely extraordinary. There’s simply no other way to watch it as far as I’m concerned. The only problem is with some of the blue screen special effects not looking so special in such rich detail but if you love the movie as much as I do, no doubt you’ll overlook that. The sheer emotional power of such scenes as the parting of The Red Sea and the fiery finger of God writing The Ten Commandments overcome that for me.


So should you see THE TEN COMMANDMENTS? No doubt you already have but just in case you haven’t, then by all means you should. If you’ve watched and enjoyed movies such as “Titanic” “Avatar” “Lord of The Rings” and “Star Wars” then this is their grandfather. It’s sheer visual grandeur that still has the power to blow audiences away. It’s the best example of captivating, enthralling movie making that succeeds in transporting us to another time and place. It’s a story of faith and destiny with romance, action, adventure, drama, humor and spectacle. You ask me what I think is the greatest motion picture ever made and I’ll say THE TEN COMMANDMENTS every time.

Rated G

220 minutes


House On Haunted Hill

Warner Home Video

Produced and Directed by William Castle
Written by Robb White

Sooner or later I get asked the question: “Derrick, what’s your favorite horror movie?” and the answer I give is one that never fails to get the same reaction. The questioner’s eyes open wide and the corners of their mouths turn down a bit. “Really?” they’ll say. “Isn’t that movie kinda…well…corny?” Well, maybe so but then I recall the old saying about one man’s trash being another man’s treasure. And HOUSE ON HAUNTED HILL is a treasure of mine. Maybe it’s because I have fond memories of watching the movie along with my parents and my sisters every time it was shown on Channel 9 here in New York during the 70’s. When I first started to try to write stories when I was around ten I must have rewritten HOUSE ON HAUNTED HILL a hundred times. Maybe it’s because the story ends on a plot twist that to an impressionable young writer such as I was at the time was nothing short of brilliance. As an adult I’ve long ago stopped trying to analyze why I like something. It’s just enough that I watch it and it’s a ritual that every Halloween I watch HOUSE ON HAUNTED HILL.

Eccentric millionaire Frederick Loren (Vincent Price) has invited five people to stay the night in a genuine haunted house. It’s haunted because seven people were murdered there some years ago and supposedly their ghosts still walk the halls, wreaking vengeance on any foolish enough to stay the night. Loren is willing to risk staying the night along with his wife Annabelle (Carol Ohmart) and he’ll give the other five $10,000 apiece if they will also stay.

It’s an equally eccentric bunch Loren has invited. Lance Schroeder (Richard Long) is a test pilot who wants to test his nerve. Nora Manning (Carolyn Craig) is a secretary supporting her family and she honestly needs the money more than the others. Watson Pritchard’s (Elisha Cook) family used to own the house and Watson himself is the only human being to have ever survived a night in the house. It’s doubtful that his sanity has survived. Dr. David Trent (Alan Marshal) is a psychiatrist who wants to test his theories on hysteria and shock. Ruth Bridges (Julie Mitchum) is a nationally syndicated columnist who needs the money to cover her gambling debts and keep herself out of the gossip columns. Everybody is locked inside at midnight and can’t leave until 8AM the next morning. Loren passes out .45 automatics as ‘party favors’ and that’s when things start happening.

Blood drips from the ceiling. There’s a severed head that keeps disappearing and re-appearing in the most inappropriate places. There are secret passages, a vat of acid in the basement. Ghostly women float in mid-air outside the barred windows while horrendous lightning storms shake the house. The ghosts appear to be focusing their attention on Nora who despite her steady, dependable exterior is swiftly driven to near madness. But is it really something supernatural at work here or does the source of the house’s evil have a human cause?

HOUSE ON HAUNTED HILL is great fun to watch if you approach it in the right spirit. Sure it was filmed on the cheap and the special effects aren’t exactly special. But there’s that wonderful Vincent Price performance and both Carolyn Craig and Carol Ohmart are no Fay Wray but they’re terrific screamers in their own right. And at 75 minutes the movie doesn’t waste your time. It’s all plot with just enough characterization so that we know who’s doing what and why. And HOUSE ON HAUNTED HILL has one of the most blood-freezing scenes I’ve ever seen in a movie. Nora Manning is trying to find a secret door in a room down in the wine cellar. She bends down briefly, stands up, turns and is face to face with a hideous old woman, claw like hands outstretched, her jagged teeth bared. Nora screams and jumps back and the old woman doesn’t run out of the room. She floats. It doesn’t sound very blood-freezing when you read it but I guarantee that if anybody you know has seen HOUSE ON HAUNTED HILL they remember that scene if they don’t remember any other.

So should you see HOUSE ON HAUNTED HILL? I certainly recommend it. And there’s a double sided DVD available that has not only this version but also the 1999 remake as well which I also recommend. I don’t like it as much as the original which will always have a special place in my diseased heart but it’s worth seeing.