A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child

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1989

New Line Cinema/Heron Communications/Smart Egg Pictures

Directed by Stephen Hopkins

Produced by Robert Shaye and Rupert Harvey

Screenplay by Leslie Bohem

Story by John Skipp, Craig Spector and Leslie Bohem

Based on characters created by Wes Craven

There are those who will say that by the time the series got to A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET 5: THE DREAM CHILD, Ol’ Freddy Krueger and his antics were getting pretty tired. I don’t agree with that. There’s still a lot of talent hard at work in this one and in a lot of ways, it’s a better story than “The Dream Master” which invoked the rule of Just Go With It as opposed to adequately explaining its plot. At least here in THE DREAM CHILD, screenwriter Leslie Bohem respects the intelligence of the audience by providing a motivation and a reason for Freddy once more coming back to life. And it’s a pretty good idea Freddy has at that. The movie also boasts a Freddy Krueger that’s significantly more sadistic than he was in his earlier movies. The story is darker and the kills more gruesome and personal. In fact, I’d go so far as to say this is the darkest movie of the series so far and will remain so until we get to “New Nightmare”

Life has finally become normal for Alice Johnson (Lisa Wilcox) She’s been dating Dan (Danny Hassel) the football jock she had a crush on in “The Dream Master” and they’re making plans to travel to Europe for summer vacation after high school graduation. Her dad (Nicholas Mele) has quit drinking and rebuilt a loving, healthy relationship with his daughter. She’s even got a whole new crew of BFF’s. Greta (Erika Anderson) is a leggy, gorgeous aspiring supermodel whose every move is closely monitored by her mother. Mark (Joe Seely) is a geek who plans on being a comic book artist and is madly in love with Greta. Yvonne (Kelly Jo Minter) works as a candy striper at the local hospital.

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Yes, Alice’s life seems like it’s all going to be sunshine, lollypops and rainbows from here on out. Until the new nightmares start. Nightmares where Alice is dressed in a nun’s habit and wearing a nametag saying ‘Amanda Krueger.’ She’s in a lunatic asylum where she is attacked by the inmates. There are more dreams in which Alice, as Amanda, relives Freddy’s cursed birth by herself giving birth to him. Once again reborn, Freddy sets about killing Alice’s friends but leaving her alone. Alice discovers why after Dan’s shocking and unexpected death: she’s pregnant with Dan’s baby and Freddy has used the dreams of her unborn child to get into her dreams as well. Freddy needs her alive at least until her child is born. Alice’s friends are woefully unequipped to help her but she does have one powerful ally. Amanda Krueger’s spirit has joined the fight to aid Alice in defeating her damned son once and for all.

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Although Lisa Wilcox has improved a lot as an actress since “The Dream Master” the real star here is the special effects, the dream imagery and three of the most visually striking kills of the entire series. Dan is riding on a motorcycle that merges with him and both become this H.R. Giger inspired biomechanical demon. There’s a simply amazing shot of this creature roaring down a highway billowing smoke behind it. Mark falls asleep and is sucked into a black-and-white comic book where he is turned into a 2D character. When Freddy cuts him, instead of blood flowing out, it’s all the color from his body. Greta is fed to death. It’s a lot more creepy and grisly than it sounds, trust me.

The ending is also imaginatively done with Alice, Amanda and Freddy all trying to get to Alice’s son on M.C. Escher staircases that go every whichaway. It’s a fun scene to watch but we get back to the gruesomeness in the jaw dropping scene after that where Freddy tears his way out of Alice’s body. The special effects boys obviously had a field day in this movie and it shows. There’s some truly imaginative stuff done here.

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The acting is nothing to brag about. The cast of this movie are all nice to look at and they work hard at trying to create characters but it’s obvious way too early that these are just victims and outside of Alice don’t present any real threat to Freddy at all. Kelly Jo Minter gets the thankless job of being the one friend who doesn’t believe any of this Freddy Krueger stuff and so is stuck with repeating the same lines about Alice acting crazy over and over and over again. The few scenes that Erika Anderson and Joe Seely have are quite cute, though. His character’s crush on Greta is genuinely sweet and he does make a good impact on the screen when he states how much he loved her.

The two characters and actors who really stand out are supporting characters. There’s Whitby Hertford as Alice’s son, Jacob. Pazuzu only knows where the casting director found this kid from but his big sad eyes, deadpan expression and delivery of my favorite line of his: “Oh. Hello” tickled me to no end. And Nicholas Mele as Alice’s dad gets to show a nice bit of character development in here. In “The Dream Master” he was an obnoxious, self-hating drunk unable to deal with the death of his wife and had lost touch with his kids. Apparently the death of his son in that movie pulled him together and in THE DREAM CHILD he’s a sober, fully supportive parent who’s going to AA meetings, grown back his spine and looks out for his daughter.

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But I can understand why A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET 5: THE DREAM CHILD is considered to be a tired movie. By this time it’s pretty clear that nothing anybody can do is ever going to be enough to get rid of Freddy for good. The final scene makes that clear. So why continue with the series if Freddy’s never going to be defeated? I guess that’s why New Line decided to make the next one; “Freddy’s Dead” the last one. But Freddy certainly didn’t deserve to go out the way he does in that one.

But that’s a review for another time. You want to hear if A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET 5: THE DREAM CHILD is worth your time. Well, if you’ve watched the first four then why wouldn’t you watch this one? It’s not a waste of time but it is one that you could have playing in the background while you’re doing other stuff and not feel as if you’re missing anything. Enjoy.

90 Minutes

Rated R

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