wesley snipes

The Expendables 3

The Expendables 3 New Banner

Directed by Patrick Hughes

Produced by Avi Lerner, Kevin King-Templeton, Danny Lerner, Les Weldon and John Thompson

Screenplay by Creighton Rothenberger, Katrin Benedikt and Sylvester Stallone

Based on a story by Sylvester Stallone

Based on characters by David Callaham

It seems like a small and petty thing, I know. But every time I watch an Expendables movie I always wish I had thought to name one of my characters Hale Caesar before these series of movies started. What does that have to do with my review of THE EXPENDABLES 3? Absolutely nothing. It was just a random thought that occurred to me when Terry Crews showed up on the screen I thought I’d share. The time it took for me to relate that thought is also about the same amount of screen time that Terry Crews/Hale Caesar has before he’s shot by Conrad Stonebanks (Mel Gibson) the man who co-founded The Expendables along with Barney Ross (Sylvester Stallone) Stonebanks turned on his own team to become an illegal international weapons dealer, forcing Barney to come after him. Barney thought he had killed Stonebanks. He thought wrong.

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Barney’s CIA contact Max Drummer (Harrison Ford) tells Barney he’s got one more shot at Stonebanks as he’s wanted by The Hague to stand trial as a war criminal. For reasons that are never really made clear, Barney fires his current team: His second-in-command and knife expert Lee Christmas (Jason Statham) Sniper Gunner Jensen (Dolph Lundren) Demolitions expert Toll Road (Randy Couture) and Doctor Death (Wesley Snipes) one of the original Expendables who just might be as good if not better with knives as Lee Christmas and also acts as team medic.

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With the help of “talent scout” Bonaparte (Kelsey Grammer) Barney recruits a younger, hipper squad of Expendables: ex-Navy Seal John Smilee (Kellan Lutz) Hand-to-hand combat specialist and professional bouncer Luna (Ronda Rousy) hacker Thorn (Glenn Powell) and sharpshooter Mars (Victor Ortiz) The one more shot at Stonebanks goes fubar and Barney has to swallow his pride to get his old team back to help him rescue the kids, assisted by Barney’s best frenemy Trench Mauser (Arnold Schwarzenegger) martial artist Yin Yang (Jet Li) and Galgo (Antonio Banderas) expert sharpshooter and professional madman.

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Whew. Sounds like a lot to keep track of, doesn’t it? Well, there are a whole lot of characters and because we’ve got so many characters, the plot seems a lot more complicated than it actually is. While I enjoyed THE EXPENDABLES 3 a lot I can’t help but think that this one should have focused totally on the Stonebanks plot and saved recruiting a new team of younger Expendables for the fourth movie. Because the biggest WTH in the movie is Barney firing the old guys who most certainly have more of a reason for taking Stonebanks down since it’s their teammate he put in the hospital and both Barney and Doctor Death were on the original team betrayed by Stonebanks.

It also sticks out like the moles on Morgan Freeman’s face that the movie adheres to the rule that there can only be one black guy on a team at a time. Me, I’d have had Gunner get shot and near death for most of the movie’s running time. Nothing against Dolph Lundgren, understand. I just like Terry Crews/Hale Caesar more and would have enjoyed seeing him get more screen time and usually it’s him and Randy Couture who get shorted in the two sequels we’ve had.

The acting honors in this one goes to Mel Gibson who played a bad guy in “Machete Kills” and stole that movie like he steals this one. Stonebanks really doesn’t have much characterization or motivation for what he does but he’s a bad guy who so obviously enjoys being a bad guy I ended up liking him a lot. And Antonio Banderas is practically a live action cartoon as a mercenary desperate to join The Expendables who simply cannot stop talking. Banderas acts totally off the wall and is obviously having a lot of fun. Out of all the new Expendables introduced I’d most like to see him and Ronda Rousey return. A female MMA who is ranked at being #1 in the world in her class, she gets some really terrific fight scenes in the climactic battle between The Expendables, old team and new versus the onslaught of Stonebanks’ private army. I really enjoyed the chemistry she has with Banderas and hope they exploit it in the next movie (what, you really think that there isn’t going to be an “Expendables 4?’)

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I’ve heard and read some less than favorable reviews of THE EXPENDABLES 3 and I’m not going to say that they’re not valid. But for me, I went into the movie expecting nothing more an an action movie version of “The Avengers” and that’s what I got. For me it’s just a lot of fun seeing all these actors together on the same screen blowing shit up and shooting everything in sight. I’ve heard some complaints that there’s really no reason for people like Harrison Ford and Kelsey Grammer to be in the movie and that Jet Li should have had more to do. I was perfectly happy with Kelsey Grammer coming in, doing what he’s supposed to be doing and then he’s gone. Jet Li has already been established as a team member so having him show up for the final fight to back up his friends is okay by me.

So should you see THE EXPENDABLES 3? If you saw and enjoyed the first two, then Yes. The action sequences will definitely get your adrenaline pumping and I for one appreciated the effort on the part of the screenwriters to give us a story totally different from from the first two “Expendables” and at least make an effort to take the franchise in a new direction. Now the real test is going to come in “The Expendables 4” Are the new kids going to stick around and we’ll see Barney work at integrating the old-timers with the new kids and teaching them how to work as one unit? I hope so. We’ll see. In the meantime, go see THE EXPENDABLES 3 and have a good time.

126 minutes

Rated PG-13

 

Brooklyn’s Finest

2010

Overture Films

Directed by Antoine Fuqua

Produced  by Basil Iwanyk, John Langley, John Thompson and Elie Cohn

Written by Michael C. Martin

It struck me even back then as somewhat unusual and even slightly humorous  that the two police/crime movies to hit theaters that year were actually throwbacks.  “Cop Out” is a homage to The 1980’s Buddy Cop Movie.  If you’ve seen “Lethal Weapon” “The Last Boy Scout” “Bulletproof” “Bad Boys” “Money Train” or “Running Scared” then you’ll know what I’m talking about.

BROOKLYN’S FINEST reminded me a lot of an old school cop movie from the 70’s or 80’s.  Amped up with a lot more violence, drug use and sex but still, it’s a throwback to an era when directors, writers and actors weren’t afraid to make their characters unlikable and unsympathetic.  Many of the characters in BROOKLYN’S FINEST do some pretty reprehensible things.  Including the three police officers the movie follows as they walk a moral tightrope that threatens to break under them every day.

Eddie Dugan (Richard Gere) has been a beat cop for twenty-two years and he’s down to his last seven days before retirement.  He has no family, no future and no desire to do anything more than ride out those last seven days as quietly as possible.  The last thing he needs or wants is to be given an ambitious rookie to train.  But his commanding officer appeals to his last crumb of pride; “Don’t you want your last week to mean something?”

Detective Sal Procida (Ethan Hawke) needs money and a lot of it.  He’s got a too small house full of kids and his wife (Lili Taylor) is pregnant with twins.  On top of that, her lungs are clogged with wood mold that aggravates her asthma and jeopardizes the health of their unborn children.  Sal heads up drug raids on crack houses where the bathtubs are full of money and he’s been helping himself here and there.  But it’s not enough.  The bills are piling up and there’s this brand new house he needs a down payment for.

Clarence Butler (Don Cheadle) aka ‘Tango’ is an extremely successful undercover detective.  He’s been working the drug trade in Brownsville and is best friends with Casanova Phillips (Wesley Snipes) one of the most powerful and successful drug lords in Brooklyn.  Tango, despite all his instincts and training has developed a real friendship with Casanova.  A friendship that means nothing to his boss Lt. Hobarts (Will Patton) and an ambitious Federal Agent (Ellen Barkin).  They want Tango to set up Casanova for a federal bust.  It means a way out of the undercover game for Tango.  A game that has already cost Tango his marriage and threatens his sanity, not to mention his life as Casanova has suspicions there’s a snitch in his camp.

Sounds like a hell of a thriller, doesn’t it?  Well, I hate to be the one to tell you this but while it is entertaining enough; BROOKLYN’S FINEST isn’t exactly the home run you would think it would be from the cast and director.  Remember that Antoine Fuqua is the director who gave us “Training Day” which really did put a new spin on the cop movie genre.   But while watching BROOKLYN’S FINEST I got the distinct feeling of ‘been there, done that’.  The influences of movies such as “Deep Cover” “New Jack City” “Cop” and “Report To The Commissioner” run through the movie.  Not that that’s a bad thing.  Not at all.  But it’s just that there’s nothing ambitious about BROOKLYN’S FINEST and no attempt to bring anything new to this familiar story of When Good Cops Go Bad.

One of the major flaws is that I never got the sense I was watching one cohesive story.  The three cops all work in the same precinct but never interact except for one blink-and-you’ll-miss-it exchange between Dugan and Procida.  And there’s a brief scene where Dugan and Tango literally bump into each other and that’s it.  The movie is constantly bouncing between the three stories and quite honestly, the Dugan story sucks the life out of the other two.  Every time we cut to Dugan the pacing and energy of the movie slowly dials down and when we get back to Tango’s story or Sal’s story, director Antoine Fuqua has to work twice as hard to regain that momentum back.

The acting is as good as you would expect from the cast.  Wesley Snipes and Don Cheadle are so good on screen together and their scenes snap, crackle and pop so much that you’ll wish the movie had been more about them.  Cheadle also has some great scenes with Ellen Barkin as Federal Agent Smith.  Barkin goes toe-to-toe with Cheadle in the acting ring and gives just as good as she gets.

Richard Gere is very good playing the soon to be retired Dugan.  We’re told several times during the movie that Dugan’s career was ‘undistinguished’ and ‘unmemorable’ but I think he’s a guy who sees being a cop as just a job and not a Holy Calling.  He’s not out to save the world like his ambitious trainee.  He just wants to go home at the end of the day and drink himself into oblivion.

I did find it funny that the tanned, handsome, obviously well-fed, fit and distinguishably silver-haired Richard Gere is supposed to be the burnt-out alcoholic when it’s Ethan Hawke who really acts like one.  With his greasy hair hanging in his face, pale as milk skin, twitchy mannerisms, chain smoking and looking as if he’s only read or heard about the beneficial personal daily use of soap and water, Ethan Hawke’s character is so wired it’s as if he’s about to run through the screen right at us screaming like a madman at any moment.   It’s also funny that even though we’re constantly told the Gere character is a raging alcoholic we only see him take a drink twice during the movie’s 133 minutes running time.

So should you see BROOKLYN’S FINEST?  I’d say yes but it’s not what I would call a Must See.  Don’t get me wrong; it’s as solidly professional a movie as you could hope for.  The acting and direction are right on point.  But the story (or should I say stories) aren’t anything new and there’s some fancy juggling the writer has to do at the end to finally have the fates of the three cops all play out in the same building in Brownsville’s Van Dyke housing project that I didn’t entirely buy but what the hell.  If you enjoy a down-and-dirty cop movie that isn’t afraid to wallow in its own excess of drugs, sex and violence then by all means check out BROOKLYN’S FINEST.

133 minutes

Rated R:  And it lives up to its rating so don’t say I didn’t warn you.  This movie has extremely vulgar language, brutal and bloody violence as well as graphic sex scenes.

Blade vs. Jack Crow

In Episode 127 of Better In The Dark: NOT ALL BAD DOGS HOWL AT THE MOON–THE CAREER OF JAMES WOODS  Thomas Deja and I get into a pretty spirited discussion involving one of our favorite James Woods character: Jack Crow, the badass, Vatican sanctioned fearless vampire killer from the John Carpenter directed “Vampires”

Tom and I kick it around for a while as to what would happen if Jack Crow had to take out Blade, the human/vampire hybrid played by Wesley Snipes who protects mankind from vampires.  So feared is he among vampires that he has become legend among them, known as The Daywalker.

I’m not gonna tell you how the discussion ended save to direct you to listen to the episode yourself and if you can get past the shouted out interjections, hurled racial slurs and disparaging remarks made about our respective mommas, you’ll find out what we think.  But what do you think?  Who would come out on top in a Jack Crow vs. Blade battle?