Denzel Washington

The Equalizer

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2014

Village Roadshow Pictures/Escape Artists/Columbia Pictures

Directed by Antoine Fuqua

Produced by Todd Black, Jason Blumethal, Denzel Washington, Alex Siskin, SteveTisch, Mace Neufeld, Tony Eldridge and Michael Sloan

Screenplay by Richard Wenk

Based on the CBS TV Show “The Equalizer” created by Michael Sloan and Richard Lindheim

Back in the bad old days of the 1980’s, a TV show such as “The Equalizer” was a slam dunk hit. Taking place in a New York City that was much darker and certainly more dangerous than the New York City of today, “The Equalizer” starred the highly respected and talented British actor Edward Woodward as ex-black ops specialist Robert McCall. McCall retires from “The Company” and takes up residence in Manhattan. Seeking to reconcile with his now adult son and atone for the dirty deeds he did as a covert operative, McCall puts an ad in all the major newspapers: “Odds against you? Need help? Call The Equalizer. 212-555-4200” As The Equalizer, McCall puts his considerably dangerous and lethal skills at the service of those innocent people who for some reason cannot get help from the authorities.

The reason the show became a hit? Because with crime being as rampant as it was during the 1980’s, many felt that an real-life Equalizer was exactly what the city needed. And make no mistake; sure he was middle aged but Robert McCall was a Bad Ass. In fact, The Equalizer was the Bad Ass that other bad asses called when they needed help. And to go along with his Bad Ass self, The Equalizer had an equally Bad Ass Theme Song:

The film version of THE EQUALIZER is a very loose adaptation of the TV show in that our main character played here by Denzel Washington is also named Robert McCall and he too worked for an ultra-secret government espionage agency as a covert operative. And he helps out ordinary people who need extraordinary help. But while watching THE EQUALIZER I couldn’t help but think that the current superhero movie boom is affecting even action thrillers as this movie is put together like a superhero origin movie.

When we meet Robert McCall we see he spends his days living and working at a Home Depot clone called Home Mart in Boston. He can’t sleep most nights so he hangs out in the neighborhood diner, reading the classics and drinking tea. It’s during these nights that he meets and become friends with Teri (Chloe Grace Moretz) a young Russian prostitute.

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A savage beating at the hands of her pimp puts her in the hospital. McCall visits the pimp to try and buy Teri out of that life and let’s just say negotiations do not go well. What McCall is unaware of is that the pimp was a member of the Russian Mafia and its godfather Vladimir Pushkin (Vladimir Kulich) sends his enforcer, Teddy (Marton Csokas) to handle the situation. And in a frighteningly short amount of time McCall finds himself not only at war with the Russian Mafia but also with the corrupt cops on their payroll. It seems as if the odds are against McCall but then again, he is The Equalizer, right?

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The plot isn’t exactly the most original but let’s be honest: we’re not going to see this movie because we’re looking for a wildly original or innovative spin on the Action Thriller. We’re going to see Denzel Washington play a Bad Ass who kicks much ass. And that’s precisely what we get. Washington has played much more complex, layered characters in other movies so we know he can. The Edward Woodward Robert McCall had more depth than Washington’s but again, there’s not a lot of depth called for here and Washington doesn’t give McCall any more than needed. We get subtle little hints as apparently McCall has some form of OCD and that he was once married. But at the same time, Washington doesn’t allow any of that to get in the way of what he’s delivering.

I was disappointed that Chloe Grace Moretz didn’t have more scenes with Washington as her role is little more than an extended cameo. Her character is here to jumpstart the plot and get McCall involved with the Russian Mafia and that’s it. Marton Csokas radiates real menace as Teddy and there’s a wonderful scene where McCall confronts Teddy in a restaurant and even while he’s being the personification of evil, Teddy is being polite and even respectful toward McCall. Melissa Leo and Bill Pullman have Blink-And-You’ll-Miss-Them extended cameos as former colleagues of McCall’s he visits for information.

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The direction by Antoine Fuqua is solid and stylish. Some may say a little too stylish but I didn’t mind as it gave the movie a distinctive look from say, the “Taken” movies which also has a middle-aged hero pounding the piss outta the bad guys. It’s a nice touch that McCall doesn’t really become The Equalizer until the end of the movie where we finally see that classic ad being used, but in a modern way. All they left out was the theme song which would have made the final scene of the movie perfect.  THE EQUALIZER is not a complicated movie at all. It’s as simple as a peanut butter & jelly sandwich and just as enjoyable. Don’t go into it expecting a “Training Day” or “2 Guns” and you’ll be just fine. Enjoy.

Rated R

131 Minutes

Flight

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2012

Paramount Pictures

Directed by Robert Zemeckis

Produced by Laurie MacDonald, Walter F. Parks, Jack Rapke, Steve Starkey

Written by John Gatins

Denzel Washington is such a magnificent actor that’s easy to forget just how good he is because he does it on such a consistent basis. He’s one of the few actors that you actually have to rack your brain to come up with a movie where he turns in a bad performance. And just for the record, my choice for that would be 1990’s “Heart Condition” a truly wretched comedy he did with Bob Hoskins. And he excels at playing just about every kind of character you can think of but it’s really something to see him play William “Whip” Whitaker, an airplane pilot who consumes alcohol and cocaine in such quantities that’s it a wonder he can find the bathroom, much less fly a plane.

But in FLIGHT it’s exactly his drug and alcohol addiction that is at the core of the movie. Of course, Whip had no business getting on the plane while high. But would a sober pilot have taken the chance of flying a commercial airplane with 102 people on board upside down to bring it out of a dive? A dive that certainly would have killed everyone on board. Whip crash-lands the plane in a field. Six people are killed but still it is nothing less than a miracle that anybody at all was able to walk away from the plane. The movie raises the definitely controversial suggestion that it actually was Whip’s breakfast of vodka and cocaine pumping in his system that enabled him to pull off the unconventional maneuver.

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Whip is under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board, who performed a toxicology screen on him while he was unconscious in the hospital after the crash. Whip’s slick union lawyer Hugh Lang (Don Cheadle) is positive he can get the toxicology report buried. If he can’t then Whip will find himself up on manslaughter charges. But there is an excellence chance that the cause of the crash was a malfunction in the plane’s structure itself. Of course it would help if Whip can stay sober until after his hearing so as not to give the press even the slightest suspicion that there’s anything wrong with him.

Good luck with that. Whip’s alcoholism actually gets worse even though his heroin addicted girlfriend Nicole (Kelly Reilly) is getting help recovering from her problem and she soon realizes that staying with Whip isn’t exactly good for her sobriety. Whip’s old friend Charlie Anderson (Bruce Greenwood) finally has to admit that Whip’s illness is far worse than he knew and absolutely beyond his control to deal with.

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Not that there isn’t a lot of blame to go around with the crash of SouthJet Flight 227.  The night before Whip and one of his flight attendants (Nadine Velazquez) partied it up with plenty of booze, coke and sex. The senior flight attendant Margaret (Tamara Tunie) knew that the both of them were high when they stepped on the plane and later on, Whip’s co-pilot Ken (Peter Gerety) admits to Whip that he called his wife to tell her that he was worried as he could smell the alcohol on Whip. But neither he nor Margaret said anything which makes them just as responsible if the NTSB finds that Whip was responsible for the plane’s crashing.

Whip Whitaker is the sort of role that an actor takes when they want to show that they can ACT and while Denzel Washington long ago proved that, I do see why he wanted this role. It’s wildly against the type of role we like to see Denzel in and after seeing this movie I understand why so many black women disliked the movie. They didn’t want to see an alcoholic, drug addicted Denzel Washington messin’ around with a heroin addicted white woman. They got enough on their hands dealing with brothers out here already doing that. In addition, Denzel isn’t his usual suave, handsome self. He plays an alcoholic mess and he truly does look the part. Although I wonder if a guy who gets as high as Whip does on a regular basis could hold down his job as long as he did without his problem being detected or affecting his job.

The supporting performances don’t really stand out as this is Denzel’s show all the way but I liked them all. John Goodman breezes in and out as Whip’s drug dealer, bringing dependable comic relief with him. Kelly Reilly is an actress I’m unfamiliar with but she does a capable job. Don Cheadle is a guy who is usually all high energy but not here. He’s calm and relaxed, even when he’s faced with such a train wreck of a client. The always wonderful-to-watch Melissa Leo shows up in a small but pivotal part at the end of the movie. And Bruce Greenwood is always a pleasure to watch.

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So should you see FLIGHT? If you’re a Denzel Washington fan you probably already have. It’s a movie I definitely wouldn’t have expected from director Robert Zemeckis as it’s a fearsomely dark movie which is most certainly not light entertainment. It’s an exploration of addiction at its most harrowing and out of control. It’s not a fun movie but it is an exceptionally well-made one and if you have a strong stomach, I recommend it highly.

Rated R

138 Minutes

American Gangster

2007

Universal Pictures

Directed by Ridley Scott

Produced by Brain Grazer and Ridley Scott

Screenplay by Steve Zaillian

Based on the article “The Return of Superfly” by Mark Jacobson

This isn’t the first time that Denzel Washington and Russell Crowe have squared off against each other in a movie.  Anybody remember the 1995 sci-fi thriller “Virtuosity”?  In that one, Denzel Washington was the cop and Russell Crowe was the bad guy, a virtual reality serial killer unleashed on the real world.  In the years between “Virtuosity” and AMERICAN GANGSTER both actors have made an impressive amount of really fine films and they’ve both won Best Actor Oscars.  Both men have achieved a level of respect and professional achievement that few actors today can claim.  And separately just their names are enough to guarantee a big weekend box office.  So putting them together again in a movie should assure us of some really outstanding scenes between the two of them since both men have done nothing but get better at their craft since 1995, right?

I wish I could say it was so but AMERICAN GANGSTER is a lot like the Robert DeNiro/Al Pacino crime thriller “Heat” or Robert DeNiro/Kevin Costner in “The Untouchables” in that for most of the movie we’re following two separate but intertwined storylines and we have to wait about two hours before we get to what we want to see: the two main actors going at it.  It’s worth the wait to finally see Denzel and Russell face to face, trust me on that but the few scenes they have together are so good you can’t help but wish they had more of them.

It’s the 1970’s and Frank Lucas (Denzel Washington) has inherited the crime empire of his boss, the legendary Harlem gangster Bumpy Johnson who has passed away from an unexpected heart attack.  Frank doesn’t waste time in consolidating his power.  To do this he intends to control the heroin traffic in Harlem by cutting out any and all middlemen and making a deal directly with the supplier.  Frank himself flies to Bangkok and with the help of his cousin (Roger Guenveur Smith) he strikes a deal for a previously unheard of amount of heroin that is 100% pure.  He gives it a brand name: ‘Blue Magic’ and sells his product for half the price of his competitors.  Frank brings up his family from North Carolina, including his elderly mother (Ruby Dee) and buys a huge mansion estate for them all to live in.  He makes his five brothers his lieutenants and they proceed to make money.  A whole lot of money.

Ritchie Roberts (Russell Crowe) isn’t having as much fun in his life as Frank is in his.  Ritchie’s wife is divorcing him because of his constant womanizing and his single-minded devotion to his job.  Ritchie is such an honest cop that he turns in a million bucks to his superiors without even thinking for a minute about keeping it for himself.  It’s simple for him because he looks at it simply: the money was made illegally.  He’s a cop.  Cops don’t take illegal money.  Haw.  Remember that this is back in the 1970’s when police corruption in New York was just part of the job.  Ritchie is ostracized by his fellow officers and so he jumps at the chance when his boss (Ted Levine) gives him a chance to head up his own squad of Untouchables who will target the high-level drug dealers.  No nickel-and-dime dealers.  Ritchie’s investigations eventually lead him to Frank Lucas who has managed to stay under the radar for so long because he doesn’t go in for the flashy pimped out lifestyle of his peers like Nicky Barnes (Cuba Gooding, Jr.) Not Frank.  He dresses in conservative business suits and takes his momma to church every Sunday.  He doesn’t get high off his own supply and he runs his organization with a professionalism that makes him the gangland equivalent of Donald Trump.

Frank intrigues Ritchie who is amazed that a black man could amass so much wealth and power that even old school Mafia kingpins like Dominic Gattano (Armand Assante) give him respect and he’s determined to take Frank down.  It’s not going to be an easy job as Ritchie has no idea how Frank is smuggling his product into the United States and there’s a crooked cop (Josh Brolin) who is making life hell for both Frank and Ritchie.  The lives of these two men intersect at a very critical juncture in their lives and once they join together their story has a unique twist.

AMERICAN GANGSTER works extremely hard at wanting to be an epic crime drama.  But I actually think it works more as a character study of the two men, Frank Lucas and Ritchie Roberts.  Frank Lucas is a cold-blooded killer who can set a man on fire without blinking and sell heroin to children without losing a night’s sleep.  But he also provides for his family, instills a (twisted) set of business values and ethics in his brothers and faithfully attends church every Sunday.  Ritchie Roberts is a helluva cop who chases bad guys by day and goes to law school at night.  He’s also a neglectful father and a lousy husband.  Family values is an elusive concept for Ritchie who seems genuinely puzzled that his wife doesn’t accept his womanizing and off-hour association with the lowlife of New York City.  I think that director Ridley Scott spends so much time on the separate stories of these two men, both of who are looking for The American Dream in their own way and allows us to examine their moral values and ethical codes and he wants us to make up our minds as to what we think of how they achieve it.

Ridley Scott is a strange choice for this type of straight-up crime thriller.  I think perhaps the closest he’s come to a movie like this is 1989’s “Black Rain” starring Michael Douglas.  Ridley Scott is not the first director you think of when it comes to crime thrillers.  In the hands of Martin Scorsese or Carl Franklin I think the movie would have had more bite to it.  As it is Scott focuses more on how these two men conduct their business and their relationships to those around them.  As a result you’re not going to find over-the-top violence such as in “Scarface” “Goodfellas” or “The Departed”.  There is violence, sure.  But it’s handled in an almost documentary like manner.

Denzel Washington turns in his usual outstanding performance as Frank Lucas.  By now we’re all so used to Denzel being so good that it’s no surprise that we’re not able to take our eyes off him when he’s on the screen.  He’s gotten really good at playing bad guys.  And Russell Crowe is easily his equal in acting ability.  Separately they create fully realized characters and both men do more in a scene by saying nothing than other actors do with ten minutes of dialog.  They’re just that good.  And they’re backed up by an equally impressive supporting cast.  Ruby Dee has a really splendid scene where she has to talk Frank down from doing something really stupid and the honesty of the scene comes right out of the screen and grabs you by the shoulders.  Josh Brolin as Detective Trupo steps up his game considerably.  He has scenes with Denzel Washington and Russell Crowe and damn if he doesn’t hold his own with the both of them.  It’s an impressive acting job he does here.  Chiwetel Ejiofor and Common have roles as two of Frank’s brothers.  Cuba Gooding, Jr. continues his streak as the most puzzling actor of all time.  Why does this man continue to waste his talent in unfunny so-called comedies when he has such a gift for dramatic roles?  His five minutes as Nicky Barnes in AMERICAN GANGSTER beats out the entirety of “Boat Trip” “Rat Race” and “Snow Dogs” all put together.

I was puzzled by Joe Morton’s character of Charlie Williams who in appearance is a near dead ringer for Gordon Parks.  His character’s relationship to Frank Lucas is never really explained.  He shows up every now and then, gives Frank some sage words of wisdom and then he’s gone.  And while we’re on the subject the relationship between Frank Lucas and his wife Eva (Lymari Nadal) isn’t all that satisfying either.  Despite the scene where Frank goes ballistic on Dominic Gattano when a hit on Frank goes wrong and his wife is almost killed I wasn’t convinced that either of them were ever that much in love with the other.

So should you see AMERICAN GANGSTER?  If you’re a fan of Denzel Washington and Russell Crowe then you probably already have.  And with good reason.  Both men are at the top of their game right now and watching them work is truly a pleasure.  The supporting cast does their job and backs up the leads superbly.  The direction is realistic and not unnecessarily bombastic.  And no, I don’t think that AMERICAN GANGSTER is the great crime epic it aspires to be but it is solid entertainment that’s worth your time to watch.

157 minutes

Rated R