Month: May 2011

The Core

Paramount Pictures
2003

Directed by Jon Amiel
Produced by Sean Bailey, David Foster and Cooper Layne
Written by Cooper Layne and John Rogers

I suppose that in order to properly appreciate a movie like THE CORE one would have to have been brought up on movies like 1966’s “Fantastic Voyage” in which a team of scientists/surgeons and their submarine are miniaturized and inserted into a human body in order to perform brain surgery from the inside. Or 1965’s “Crack In The World” where a project to tap into Earth’s geothermal energy goes wrong and a massive crack threatens to split The Earth in two as a team of scientists chase it around the world, trying to halt it. Or 1961’s “Voyage To The Bottom Of The Sea” where a nuclear submarine has to race time to fire a missile in the right place at the right time to save the world from being fried by The Van Allen radiation belt which is slowly cooking the earth.

THE CORE is a movie that makes science geeks fall out laughing because there’s not a single so called ‘scientific’ fact in it that makes a lick of sense. But while I was watching it I didn’t care one bit. Because THE CORE took me back to a time when I was kid and science fiction movies meant I was going to watch an extraordinary adventure that took me away from my Bed-Stuy neighborhood for a couple of hours and took me to a world where scientists ruled and had outrageous adventures on an everyday basis. They were not only the smartest guys in the room they were the bravest and the ballsiest. They went to the stars. To other dimensions. To the past and the future. They saved the world. They saved their friends and family. And I dearly wished I could be one of them.

Strange things are happening. Thirty people in Boston all drop dead at the same time in a 10-block radius. Pigeons in London’s Trafalgar Square lose their sense of navigation and go berserk, smashing into buildings and terrorizing people as they fly about in a frenzy. The space shuttle Endeavor has to crash land in the middle of Los Angeles because somehow their navigational beacon put them down in the wrong place. It’s only due to the exceptional navigational skills of Major Rebecca Childs (Hilary Swank) that the crew survives and the shuttle comes down in a relatively safe place.

Dr. Josh Keyes (Aaron Eckhart) has an idea what is wrong and his research is confirmed by Dr. Conrad Zimsky (Stanley Tucci) and they both present it to General Purcell (Richard Jenkins): The molten core of The Earth has stopped rotating. As a result the electromagnetic field of the planet is destabilizing and without it, Earth will be a dead planet within a year. There’s maybe only one chance: detonate a series of nuclear bombs in the core to ‘jump start’ the molten core and set it to rotating again. But how can they journey to the center of the earth itself in time?

The answer lies with Dr. Ed ‘Brazz’ Brazzelton (Delroy Lindo) who had his research stolen by Zimsky 20 years ago.  Since then he has been living out in the desert, working on his life’s dream: a ship capable of traveling through the earth utilizing a sonic laser. Brazz is given a blank check by General Purcell to build his ship and a team is assembled: Dr. Keyes, Dr. Zimsky, Dr. Brazzelton along with nuclear weapons specialist Dr. Serge Leveque (Tcheky Karyo) and to pilot the craft: Major Childs and Commander Robert Iverson (Bruce Greenwood). On the surface their support team will be General Purcell, Flight Commander Talma ‘Stick’ Stickney (Alfre Woodard) and the real wild card in the deck…a computer hacker called The Rat (DJ Qualls) who crippled the FBI’s database a year previously but has taken this job to stay out of jail. Rat’s job is to ‘hack the planet’ and monitor/obfuscate/control the flow of information on The Internet so that the rest of the world doesn’t find out it’s only got a year to live or about the mission to restart the world. The ship is built and the crew embarks on their mission inside The Earth itself to reach and restart the molten core before the world is devastated.

There is absolutely no point in trying to pretend the science of THE CORE is anything like the science we know. Hell, ‘Star Trek’ technobabble makes more sense. But y’know what? It’s so much fun watching actors like Aaron Eckhart, Tcheky Karyo, Stanley Tucci and Delroy Lindo act as if it does I didn’t care. Take for instance when Dr. Brazzelton demonstrates the miracle metal his ship is made of: it gets stronger the more pressure is applied to it and actually draws power from heat. He’s asked what it’s called and Delroy Lindo replies with a straight face: “I call it Unobtanium” How could you not love a movie that has a miracle metal called Unobtanium?

Once the mission is underway the team has to overcome a score of natural threats inside the planet itself such as lava rivers, freefall in a canyon of crystal and believe it or not, a diamond storm. In the meantime, as they travel deeper into The Earth, violent lightning storms devastate Rome and microwaves boil San Francisco. And as the team of the terranaut ship ‘Virgil’ die one by one in what is beginning to look more and more like a doomed mission, on the surface Stick and Rat have to deal with another threat…one with the sinister name of ‘Destini’…

I really can’t see how anybody wouldn’t love THE CORE unless you’re really a science geek who can’t stand anybody monkeying with your beloved rules of physics.  I remember reading an article way back when I was a kid where Isaac Asimov wrote the novelization for “Fantastic Voyage” even though he believed that miniaturization was impossible.  His reason?: “Hey, it’s a good story.” And that’s what THE CORE is. It’s impossible but it’s a good story.

The performances by all concerned are quite good. Especially Hilary Swank who looks like what I figure a real life female Air Force officer would look and behave like rather than a big-breasted bimbo playing dress-up. Delroy Lindo is also quite good as the eccentric inventor of the miracle ship that travels inside the earth. As improbable as the thing may sound, the way Mr. Lindo explains how it works you may be tempted to climb into the thing yourself just for the ride. I also liked Aaron Eckhart as Resident Brilliant Guy who can come up with any solution for any problem. Fans of Alfre Woodard are going to be disappointed as she really doesn’t have a lot to do except stay on the surface and look worried. DJ Qualls has a really nice bit where he uses a comb, the tinfoil wrapper from a stick of chewing gum and gives Eckhart’s character unlimited long distance on his cell phone. And I really liked how the scientists didn’t all immediately jump to be heroes and risk their lives. They’re all men of action but men of thought as well.

THE CORE doesn’t have a typical bad guy. It’s more of a race against time where the characters have to fight against the very elements. I suppose it could be compared to ‘Armageddon’ in a way but it’s a lot better than that Michael Bay noise-fest. The characters in THE CORE are much more likeable and when they die we feel it. It’s edge of your seat stuff that’s nothing but mad fun.  Highly recommended for a Saturday afternoon.

PG-13
135 minutes

The Expendables

2010

Lionsgate

Directed by Sylvester Stallone

Produced by Avi Lerner

Written by Sylvester Stallone and David Callaham

There are those who said even before the movie came out, speaking just on having seen the trailers that THE EXPENDABLES looked to be nothing more than Sylvester Stallone attempting to relive his glory days when he was one of the major action stars back in the 80’s.  These good folks, having regaled me with their smug wisdom sit back and ask me what I thought of that.

My response is that he does have glory days to remember and try to relive which is more than most of us will be able to say when we check out of this existence.  And he’s blessed that he can relive those days in some excellent company indeed in this movie.  THE EXPENDABLES will probably be most appreciated by those like me who remember the seemingly endless truckloads of action movies produced by Golan-Globus and Cannon Films back in the day.  THE EXPENDABLES is a love letter to the testosterone fueled action genre of the 1980’s and testosterone is exactly what you’re going to get.  Ladies who go see this movie should immediately check themselves in the rest room after viewing to be sure they aren’t growing hair on their chests or have a few more dangly bits they have no business having.

The Expendables (Sylvester Stallone, Jason Statham, Jet Li, Terry Crews, Dolph Lundgren and Randy Couture) are an elite team of mercenaries headquartered in a tattoo parlor owned by Tool (Mickey Rourke) who has retired from field duty but apparently handles the team’s accounts.   He sets up a meeting with the mysterious Mr. Church (Bruce Willis) who wants to hire The Expendables to take down General Garza (David Zayas) the brutal dictator of Vilena, a South American country that would be a paradise if it weren’t for Garza’s death squads running around doing what death squads do best: cause death.

Barney Ross (Stallone) and Lee Christmas (Statham) go down to recon the layout and finds out it stinks worse than houseguests who just won’t leave.  Seems as if Mr. Church didn’t tell them the whole story, surprise, surprise.  Garza’s just the front man.  Vilena is really being run by rogue CIA agent James Munroe (Eric Roberts) and his two hulking huge henchmen (Steve Austin and Gary Daniels)  Barney and Lee escape from Vilena but they have to leave behind their contact Sandra (Gisele Itie)

Something about Sandra’s passion to deliver her country from the hell it’s becomes wakens something in Barney’s spirit and after a heart-to-heart with Tool, he’s determined to go back to Vilena and put things right.  Not for the money but for his own redemption.  Naturally his team can’t let him go it alone and that leads to The Expendables taking on an entire army in a massively apocalyptic battle that could easily qualify as Vietnam Part II.

I had a lot of fun watching THE EXPENDABLES.  Sometimes I’m awful easy to please and this movie had me right from the gunfight at the beginning.  A gunfight that itself had more of a body count than entire movies.  And who honestly can resist a movie that for the first time has the Holy Trinity of 80’s Action Heroes (Schwarzenegger, Stallone & Willis) on screen together?  Oh, sure there are a lot of lines between the three that are nothing but nudge nudge wink wink to the audience but hey, it’s that kind of movie and I liked the whole “Hey! We’re puttin’ the band back together!’ feel of the movie even though this is the first time some of these guys have worked together.

Stallone and Statham work together as smoothly as if they’ve been making movies together for the past ten years.  Randy Couture was an unexpected source of humor as his character, demolitions expert Toll Road is the intellectual of the group.  Dolph Lundgren gets to demonstrate his trademark scowl as the psychologically damaged sniper Gunnar.  Jet Li also shows a surprising flair for comedy as he provides the movie’s running joke of him continually demanding a raise.  His deadpan delivery is what sells the running joke and I cracked up every time he came up with a new reason why he needs more money.

Everybody makes the most of their screen time and every one of the characters, good or bad gets a moment to show off which I really liked as both the good guys and bad guys are all accredited badasses and that makes the final showdown one between groups of equal skills and strength.

That’s not to say that I don’t have my gripes with the movie.  The Jet Li/Dolph Lundgren fight could have really been a David vs. Goliath type of match-up but the way it’s choreographed I really couldn’t appreciate Jet Li’s moves.  The Expendables all have colorful, wonderful names but I didn’t even know what the names of Randy Couture’s and Terry Crews’ characters were until I read them in the end credits.

The editing during the hand-to-hand combats were too choppy for me at times and one thing I really hate in a fight scene is not being able to tell who’s beating the piss outta who.

But that’s just me.  The whole point of THE EXPENDABLES is as simple as a hammer to the back of an unprotected head: put a dozen tough guy actors together in one movie and give them 103 minutes to shoot, stab, blow stuff up, run over everything in sight, smash, slice and generally raise cinematic hell.  And have a lot of fun doing it.  I know I had a lot of fun watching them do it.

Rated R:  For the astounding level of violence in this movie.  It’s not as jaw-droppingly brutal as say, the last 30 minutes of “Rambo” but its close.

103 minutes.

Thor

2012

Marvel Studios/Paramount Pictures

Directed by Kenneth Branagh

Produced by Kevin Feige

Screenplay by Ashley Edward Miller, Zack Stentz and Don Payne

Based on a story by J. Michael Straczynski and Mark Protsevich

Based on The Marvel comic book THOR created by Stan Lee, Jack Kirby and Larry Lieber

I like a lot of superheroes and love a whole bunch of others.  But ask me who my absolute favorite superhero is and without a doubt I’ll tell you its Thor.  I own a sizeable number of the issues written by Stan Lee and drawn by Jack Kirby and all of the Walt Simonson issues and they’re among my most prized possessions when it comes to my comic book collection.

Why is Thor my favorite?  Where do I begin?  I love his grandeur, his majesty, his neo-Shakespearean way of speaking.  The fact that he’s not just a superhero: he’s The God of Thunder, wielding the enchanted war hammer Mjolnir.  He doesn’t just fight mortal supervillains such as The Absorbing Man and The Wrecker.  He also battles home grown immortal foes such as Frost Giants and Trolls.  His daddy is Odin, Monarch of Asgard who is so powerful that the gods of other pantheons speak softly around him.  Thor just doesn’t go on missions…he goes on quests to save the entire universe.  I can go on and on for days but you get the idea.  The comic book itself was a good mix of epic fantasy set in Asgard or other mythical realms and straight up superhero action when Thor would visit Earth to hang out with his mortal buddies in The Avengers or assume the humble human form of Dr. Donald Blake, greatest of healers.

I never dreamed that one day a THOR movie would be made but thanks to the quantum leap in movie making and technology, movies that once were considered unfilmable are now being made on a regular basis.  And I couldn’t be happier.  I’ve lived long enough to see a “Speed Racer” movie that blew my mind to splinters and now THOR.  If somebody gets around to making “Doom Patrol” and “Challengers of The Unknown” movies as good as those two I can die a happy man.

Thor (Chris Hemsworth) is the greatest warrior in Asgard, home to a race of humanoids whose technology has given them abilities akin to that of gods.  In fact, they actually were worshiped as gods on Earth ages ago but after a war with The Frost Giants of Jotunheim, The Asgardians withdrew from Earth.  Thor himself is about to ascend the throne and take the place of All Father Odin (Anthony Hopkins) as King of Asgard.  But that’s before Frost Giants invade, seeking to reclaim their greatest weapon, The Casket of Ancient Winters.

Defying Odin’s command, Thor invades Jotunheim along with his brother, The God of Mischief, Loki (Tom Hiddleston) childhood crush and warrior maid Sif (Jaimie Alexander) and The Warriors Three: Volstagg The Voluminous (Ray Stevenson) Fandral The Dashing (Joshua Dallas) and Hogun The Grim (Tadanobu Asano).  After the furious battle that takes place, war between The Frost Giants and The Asgardians is renewed, breaking the long peace Odin worked so hard for.  Enraged, Odin casts Thor out of Asgard, stripping him of his god-like powers and sending him to Earth.  Odin also throws Mjolnir to Earth where it lands in the New Mexico desert with this enchantment: “Whosoever holds this hammer, if he be worthy, will possess the power of Thor”

The hammer attracts the attention of the locals, who try to lift it up in a redneck version of the drawing of Excalibur to no avail.  The hammer simply cannot be lifted.  It also attracts the attention of S.H.I.E.L.D. who erects a compound around the hammer.  Also interested in the hammer is astrophysicist Jane Foster (Natalie Portman) her assistant Darcy (Kat Dennings) and her mentor Dr. Erik Selvig (Stellan Skarsgard)  Jane accidentally hits Thor with her truck but that’s okay as he apparently has the answers she needs about her current research which involves wormholes.  In a really nice scene, Thor explains in an off-handed manner that his people know all about wormholes and how to use them to travel between The Nine Realms.  They don’t call their own personal wormhole a wormhole, though.  They call it Bifrost, The Rainbow Bridge and it’s the means by which The Asgardians travel though The Nine Realms.  Thor strikes a bargain with Jane: if she’ll help him get back Mjolnir, he’ll tell her what she needs to know to complete her research.  However, there are complications in this bargain.  Otherwise we wouldn’t have a movie.

THOR bounces back and forth between the doings on Earth with Thor and his new found mortal allies and the intrigue on Asgard.  Odin has fallen into the sacred Odin Sleep to renew his power and that gives Loki the opportunity to step in and take control of Asgard.  The Warriors Three, along with Sif journey to Earth to help restore Thor to his rightful power and in the background, The Frost Giants plot with a secret traitor to destroy Asgard once and for all…

Let me say right up front that you’re not going to get a bad word about THOR outta me.  I absolutely loved this movie from start to finish and there ain’t a lot of movies these days I can say that about.  I loved Chris Hemsworth’s portrayal of Thor.  Sure, he’s an arrogant ass but he’s a likeable arrogant ass.  And he’s smart enough to realize during his time on Earth that he doesn’t have all the answers.  He’s teachable.  And that makes all the difference in his relationship to every other character in the movie.  I even liked Natalie Portman who looks much more at home with the SFX in this movie than she did in the “Star Wars” movies.  Maybe it’s because in Kenneth Branagh she had a director who actually likes working with his actors.  Anthony Hopkins is properly majestic and awe inspiring as Odin.  Hell, even Rene Russo gets her moment to shine in her small role as Frigga, wife of Odin.  The SFX are simply staggering and I loved how The Rainbow Bridge looks as if it’s got arcane, ancient circuitry within its structure.

The movie could have ended after the battle with The Frost Giants and I’d have been satisfied because to me that captured the totality of the Lee/Kirby Thor.  And I can’t let this review end with once again giving a standing ovation to the performance of Clark Gregg as S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Phil Coulson. Coulson has proven to be one of the major linchpins holding the Cinematic Marvel Universe together and with good reason. Thanks to the wonderful on-point performance of Clark Gregg, Coulson demonstrates a quiet authority and calm demeanor even while dealing with Asgardian gods and super-science from beyond the stars.

And Idris Elba as Heimdall is absolutely Epic.  ‘Nuff Said.

If you haven’t seen it yet, do so.  THOR is my favorite Marvel superhero movie. And probably always will be.

114 minutes

PG-13

And as an added bonus because I couldn’t help thinking of this while the movie was playing:

Better In The Dark #107

Episode 107: BAD EQUINOX EQUILLIBRIUM EFFECTS OF SPECIAL GYMKATA HORROR

It’s that time of the year again, when Tom and Derrick sit down and come up with a six pack of films that, for one reason or another, are obscure, and tell you about them! This year The Guys Outta Brooklyn cover two films featuring…unique martial arts, a dialogue-less vision of Lynchian proportions, a Bromantic Thriller, a Stop Motion Nightmare full of flood pants and a film Oliver Stone doesn’t think you’ll see. All this plus the silliest martial arts weapon in the history of chop-socky cimema, a park ranger you have to avoid, and how being banned from New York City didn’t stop Larry Cohen. You don’t want to ban emotions, so get to clicking!

BETTER IN THE DARK
Two Guys Outta Brooklyn Talk Movies
DJ COMICS CAVALCADE
Silver Age Comics Through Modern Eyes
Join us now at www.earth-2.net!
Tom and Walter Bonham tackle the comic book issues of the day at BURNING COMICS! http://tschamp.podomatic.com
DILLON

http://dillon-dlferguson.blogspot.com/

Better In The Dark #106

Episode 106: BLACK AND WHITE IN SHADES OF GREY: THE CAREER OF JOHN FRANKENHEIMER

In one of their earliest episodes, Tom and Derrick promised they were going to do an episode about one of their favorite directors…and now, five years later, an hour-long celebration of the man behind ‘The Paranoia Trilogy’ is here! The Guys Outta Brooklyn talk about why they love John Frankenheimer, discuss their favorite films from his career (and their least favorite!), and recommend the films you need to see to begin your Frankenheimer education. Plus the return of The Bagel In The Briefcase! You don’t want to play a game of solitaire, so get to clicking!

BETTER IN THE DARK
Two Guys Outta Brooklyn Talk Movies
DJ COMICS CAVALCADE
Silver Age Comics Through Modern Eyes
Join us now at www.earth-2.net!

Diamonds Are Forever

1971

United Artists

Directed by Guy Hamilton
Produced by Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman
Screenplay written by Richard Maibaum and Tom Mankiewicz
Based on the novel by Ian Fleming

Memory is a funny thing. Ask me what I had for dinner last night and I’ll probably take a few minutes to think about it. Ask me what I did last week and there’s a better than average chance I’ll tell you I have no idea. But ask me about the Saturday afternoon in 1971 when my father took me to see my first James Bond movie DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER and I’ll go on and on for hours recounting every single detail in such a way that you would swear it had happened to me yesterday.

I think that the major reasons DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER is my absolute favorite James Bond film of all is because of two reasons: It was the first James Bond movie I saw in a theatre and I saw it with my father, who is also a huge movie fan. He took me to see Sam Peckinpah’s “The Wild Bunch” during its original theatrical run and we drove my mother crazy discussing the movie for days and days afterwards. My voracious movie addiction can be blamed on the both of them. A favorite story they like to tell about me is when they took me as a baby with them to see “The Ten Commandments”.  While other babies in the theatre were crying and had to be taken out by their disgruntled parents, my parents claim I was totally silent, eyes open as wide as possible, staring at the screen as if hypnotized. I probably was. Movies do that to me, y’know.

The movie’s pre-credits sequence has an unusually brutal James Bond (Sean Connery) hunting down his archenemy, Ernst Stavro Blofeld (Charles Gray). Although it’s never stated outright, one can assume Bond’s looking for Blofeld to take revenge for the murder of his wife, Tracy that occurred at the conclusion of the previous Bond adventure, “On Her Majesty’s Secret Service”.  Bond seemingly dispatches Blofeld in a particularly nasty manner and after the gorgeously lush theme song sung by Shirley Bassey we get into the meat of the plot:

Startling amounts of high-grade diamonds are being smuggled out of South Africa to Las Vegas by means of an efficient pipeline of couriers. There is worry that these diamonds will be dumped into the market at some future time, which would drastically drop diamond prices. Bond is assigned to follow the pipeline, an assignment that he clearly thinks is beneath his talents but M (Bernard Lee) quickly puts him in his place: “Blofeld is dead, 007. I think we have the right to expect some plain honest work from you now. Bond heads off to Amsterdam to take the place of Peter Franks, an international jewel courier and he makes the acquaintance of the superhot redheaded smuggler Tiffany Case (Jill St. John), the next contact in the pipeline.

The trail of deadly diamonds leads Bond to Las Vegas where it quickly becomes apparent that smuggling is only the tip of the iceberg as Bond’s archenemy Blofeld returns from the dead with a scheme to hold the world hostage that involves a diamond enhanced laser satellite. Now when I lay it out like that, DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER seems like your straightforward action/adventure, right? Nothing could be further from the truth. I broke the story down to its simplest elements out of space consideration but it has been said by many critics and reviewers that the plot of DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER is too complicated to properly explain and I have to agree. When you throw in the Howard Hughes-like Willard Whyte who for about half of the movie’s running time we think is the movie’s real villain, the homosexual killer duo Mr. Kidd and Mr. Wint who run around whacking the various diamond smugglers for no apparent reason and even Plenty O’Toole (Lana Wood) who at one point in the movie shows up someplace she has absolutely no business being and is drowned for no reason at all…and that’s not even half the inconsistencies and plot holes that stick out like a cockroach on a wedding cake.

But somehow, none of that seems to matter when you’re right there on the edge of your seat watching the movie. Sean Connery is James Bond and when he’s on the screen you can’t take your eyes off him. Connery understood the dynamics of a James Bond movie in a way no other actor who played the role would until Pierce Brosnan strapped on the Walter PPK and he occupies the center of the movie with total confidence. He doesn’t take it all that seriously but his performance has such wit and charm that while he’s clearly having fun with the character and the material he respects it and thereby respects us. The major acting disappointment comes from Charles Gray as Ernst Stavro Blofeld. Gray is simply too effeminate to be a towering mastermind of brilliant evil bent on world domination. He looks as if he would be more at home organizing The Sisters of The Revolving Door Tabernacle Annual Cotillion and Fish Fry. And Norman Burton barely registers on screen as ace CIA agent and Bond’s best friend Felix Leiter. But let’s face facts, except for David Hedison (who is the only actor to have played Felix Leiter twice) and Bernie Casey, Felix Leiter has never been played decently.

But we’ve got dependable regulars such as Bernard Lee, Desmond Llewelyn (Q) and Lois Maxwell (Miss Moneypenny) to pick up the slack and Jill St. John is wonderfully spicy and looks gorgeous as Tiffany Case. And any mention of the acting in this one isn’t complete without noticing the excellent work by Putter Smith and John Glover (Crispin Glover’s dad) as Mr. Kidd and Mr. Wint. The pair is not only properly chilling but also provides a good deal of the movie’s humor as they grow increasingly frustrated as Bond continually manages to circumvent their efforts to kill him. And I have to mention Lana Wood (Natalie Wood’s sister) even though it’s apparent from her first scene that she wasn’t chosen for the role for her acting ability. Why is she in the movie then? I’ll give you a clue: 36C/D-24-35. Need I say anymore other than I commend the casting director for his excellent eyesight? I even liked Jimmy Dean as eccentric multibillionaire Willard Whyte. Today Jimmy Dean is mostly known for his line of pork products but back during the ‘60’s and ‘70’s he was a fairly popular country western singer who occasionally acted. Bond and Whyte click so well during the hunt for Blofeld that I think the producers missed a bet by not having Whyte become a re-occurring character in the films. By the end of the movie Bond and Whyte seem more like best friends than Bond and Leiter.

And it never fails to amuse me that even though people will say that DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER isn’t as good as the other Connery Bonds, it’s the one that has more action sequences people can readily name right off the top of their head than any other Connery Bond. Everybody remembers the chase through the desert with Bond driving the moon buggy. There’s the classic Las Vegas car chase sequence that ends with Bond flipping his Mustang up on two wheels to slide through a narrow alley and evade his pursuers. The helicopter assault on Blofeld’s oil rig headquarters. There’s the nail-biting climb Bond performs on the outside of Willard Whyte’s Las Vegas casino/hotel. The fight in the elevator with Peter Franks. The fight with the outrageously beautiful pair of acrobatic karate killers, Bambi (Lola Larson) and Thumper (Trina Parks)

I suppose that most who read this review will probably have seen DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER on television or DVD and so won’t have the same love I have for the movie as I do. But no matter how many times I see it, I always remember seeing my first James Bond film on the big screen with my father and the feelings I had that day have never left me and it was those feelings that made me want to create stories as exciting and thrilling as the one I was watching and I suppose that in a very large way, DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER helped shaped my passion to write and for that if nothing else, it will remain my favorite James Bond movie.

125 min
Rated PG